Daily Archives: June 19, 2009

Second Edition of TP Book out Today

It’s hard to believe, but the second edition of Principles of Transaction Processing is finally available. The simple table of contents is here, and the entire front section, including the dedication, contents, introduction and details of what’s changed, is here. The first chapter is available here as a free sample.

Photo of an early press run copy

Photo of an early press run copy

It definitely turned out to be a lot more work than we expected when we created the proposal for the second edition almost four years ago.  And of course we originally expected to finish the project much sooner, about two years sooner.

But the benefit of the delay is that we were able to include more new products and technologies, such as EJB3, JPA, Spring,  the .NET Framework’s WCF and system.transactions API, Spring, SOA, AJAX, REST/HTTP, and ADO.NET even though it meant a lot more writing and rewriting.

The first edition was basically organized around the three-tier TP application architecture widely adopted at the time, using TP monitor products for examples of the implementations of the principles and concepts covered in the book. Then as now, we make sure what we describe is based on practical, real-world techniques, although we do mention a few topics more of academic interest.

The value of this book is that it explains how the world’s largest TP applications work – how they use techniques such as caching, remote communications (synchronous as well as asynchronous), replication, partitioning, persistence, queuing, database recovery, ACID transactions, long running transactions, performance and scalability techniques, locking, threading, queuing, business process management, and state management to process up to tens of thousands of transactions per second with high levels of reliability and availability. We explain the techniques in detail and show how they are programmed.

These techniques are used in airline reservation systems, stock trading systems, large Web sites, and in operational computing supporting virtually every sector of the economy. We primarily use Java EE-compliant application servers and Microsoft’s .NET Framework for product and code examples, but we also cover popular persistence abstraction mechanisms, Web services and REST/HTTP based SOA, Spring,  integration with legacy TP monitors (the ones still in use), and popular TP standards.

We also took the opportunity to look forward and include a few words about the potential impact on TP applications of current trends toward cloud computing, solid state memory, streams and event processing, and the changing design assumptions in the software systems used to power large Web sites.

Personally this has been a great project to work on, despite its challenges, complexities, and pressures. It could not have been done without the really exceptional assistance from 35 reviewers who so generously contributed their expertise on a wide variety of topics. And it has been really great to work with Phil again.

Finally, the book is dedicated to Jim Gray, who was so helpful to us in the first edition, reviewed the second edition proposal, and still generally serves as an inspiration to all of us who work in the field of transaction processing.