Monthly Archives: April 2009

IASA NE gaining momentum – April meeting set for 23rd

After nearly a year, it is starting to look like IASA New England is starting to gain some momentum. For those of you in the area, please register here for the next meeting (April 23), at which we’ll be hearing about  Intuit’s Saas/cloud initiative from their QuickBase architect, Jim Salem.

Personally, I’m looking forward to hearing the details of their active-active load balancing…

I was sorry to have to miss the March meeting due to attending EclipseCon / OSGi DevCon, but I heard it went very well and that Hub did a great job.

At the meeting we also announced that Intuit and IBM were joining in and sponsoring the April and May meetings, respectively.  This is excellent news for the NE architect community since it means we’ll have more support and access to additional excellent speakers for the meetings.

We also announced a panel discussion on cloud computing for June, a social event for July, and a regional event for this fall.  Things are really starting to fall into place!

I’m happy about this since it will be great to have an active community of software architects in the NE area. I personally always learn something new at the meetings and have a great time discussing topics with the other members.  Hope to see you on the 23rd!

IBM/Sun Post: I Forgot About Solaris

When I wrote about IBM’s potential interest in acquiring Sun to gain control of Java, I forgot about the Solaris factor. But this was mentioned in yesterday’s Times article about the acquisition, and I have seen it mentioned other places as well.

What I forgot about was Red Hat and Linux. IBM sells a lot of Red Hat Linux. After Red Hat acquired JBoss in 2006 they began competing with IBM’s WebSphere division, which must have put strain on their partnership around Linux. IBM started hedging its bets with Novell’s SUSE Linux, but open sourcing Solaris would give IBM its own alternative to Red Hat Linux.

Add that to the potential for gaining control of Java and you have two pretty compelling reasons for IBM to acquire Sun.  Of course there are probably any number of other factors, but these strike me as the most strategic.